Posts Tagged 'Video Over IP'

Is Ustream for Boradcast Television = WordPress for Journalism?

ustreamhighreslogo.jpg

 

Yesterday I played with Ustream a little. After Jeff and Chris live show I’ve decided to give it a try, and when Michael twitted me about his feed, I’ve joined the wagon.

After opening an account, I broadcasted myself within minutes.

Isn’t it just like starting a blog?

Users can connect high end cameras to Ustream, as the Pulver gang did. So, they just need a room with proper lighting and audio, and they have a live show. Simple. Ah, of course, they need to do an interesting show, cause there are so many out there. But this is not different from any other media product, that has to grab the attention of its audience.

So, after blogging platforms democratized written Journalism, YouTube and Bittorrent democratized pre-recorded video distribution, Ustream (and probably the 1000 competitors gearing up as I write this post) democratized live broadcast TV.

BlogTV is an Israeli site owned by Tapuz, one of the biggest Israeli communities portal. It provides similar features and used to broadcast live videos from northern Israel in last summer conflict. In the past, I’ve played with it a bit, but didn’t stay for long. The main reasons were:

1. Poor video and audio quality

2. Nothing interesting to see (for me)

3. Lack of context – as I saw shows in their site only, it was not connected to other types of media by the same creator (such as blogs, websites etc).

It seems that Ustream has better video quality, and allow users to add context to their show by embedding it in other sites. But just like in every other media platform, interesting stories are a must.

Advertisements

VON07: Jeff Jarvis Industry Perspective – We are taking over TV!

Let’s try some live blogging. I am at Jeff Jarvis industry perspective.

Here are the highlights:

  1. We are networks – we have channels, we have shows, we have series. we don’t have money but not expenses. We are TV – and we just began. We are 1954 in TV – TV sucked then, we suck now, but we will get better cause we can’t get worse.
  2. The advertisers give up – they loose and so are we. Our real friends have hard time in finding us. There is no longer one definition of good. The definition of big changes – blockbuster is dead. The top 100 shows are still very small.
  3. It’s about conversation – the most watched list is meaningless, size doesn’t matter – but quality does.
  4. We can do things right, and define what is right.
  5. What should we do? Our roughness is good. We don’t want to be old TV- let’s hope we don’t become one. we shouldn’t have orthodoxy.
  6. We will distribute our content in various outlets. The viewers are not going to come to us. We have to go to them.
  7. Viacom legal action is stupid. YouTube gives recommendation on Viacom shows – why kill it?
  8. Old media is about control. We need to understand how we can work without control and still get money.
  9. We can work with the big guys, by cooperation. Viral is great but hard, but the good stuff are the series, that build audience over time.
  10. Money – I am not getting any money. We are not ready for advertisers.

What do we need?

  1. Measurements – Metrics is sex. In a distributed world it is harder than usual. we need context – we need a unique identifier to every video item we distribute.
  2. We need to experiment on ads
  3. We need to serve ads across platforms
  4. Trust and identity of our content across networks
  5. Help the advertisers and viewers to get in touch with us
  6. How to find good content?
  7. Relationships – big old TV won’t die and is not the enemy. they give infrastructure, we can teach them how to be smarter. CBS is doing great as they use Youtube, unlike Viacom
  8. Protection against regulation – this is not content, this is conversation. we need to fight to keep TV ours.
  9. Creativity – we will make better stuff…

This guy is very energetic, and knows how wake up the crowd. Read more at his blog.

VON07: Pulver Announce Video On The Net Coalition

Jonathan Askin, general Counsel (and Wartime Consiglieri) at Pulver.com, announced yesterday on the creation of the Video On The Net Alliance, a global consortium of video content creators and application providers aimed at keeping this new industry free from government regulation.

As you all know, Jeff Pulver has a long history in VoIP politics, and it seems like he is trying to achieve the same goals in the new video industry . You can find more information here.

Marketing Highly Technical Non Profit Organizations

As some of you know, I am VP of Marketing and Business Development of IMTC, a non profit technology organization, focused on interoperability of video communication and content delivery technologies. Basically, our members test their video conferencing, streaming and other multimedia applications in real life scenarios, and cooperate with engineers around the globe in advancing this industry.

Marketing such an organization is a major challenge. First, its work is highly technical, making it hard to extract a marketing message and convey it to media channels. Second, budget is scarce, so regular “carpet bombing” tactics (let’s send 10,000 press releases to newswire across the globe, publish ads in newspapers, and buy booth spaces in 6 shows a year) simply cannot be implemented.

In the last six months, we’ve done several steps to tackle this challenge. As you know, we are having a panel at VON about the business perspective of standardization, where we present the business aspect of our work. But this is not enough – there are tons of business oriented panels. So, in order to make it more appealing, we invited Skype, which represent the opposite approach, to join the panel and argue that non-standard approach is better for business than ours. Nothing like a good fight to clarify a message!

Another important issue is how to create an ongoing relationship with the industry. Press releases are single sided. You send them out, shoot all over the place, and hope for the best. I think that PRs are important, especially for product companies, but one thing for sure – they do not create any relationship with readers. It’s like good old television.

I am proud to say, that after a long process, we have launched IMTC blog, with writers from the organization. The blog covers technology aspects of our work, and its affect on the market. We believe that in time, it will be a news source for unbiased information on multimedia communication and content delivery market today.

Blog solves two of the issues I’ve raised. It is cheap, and creates an ongoing relationship with our readers. There is also a good chance that it will simplify our media relations – especially with key bloggers.

However, an official IMTC blog has its own challenges. Unlike press release, there are more content contributors. This opens a whole new range of legal aspects that need to be addressed. Also, blog success is highly dependent on the rate of new posts ( I call it “the Feed-Me-Seymour” blog effect). IMTC is a voluntary organization, so finding contributors for a non technical activity is not just a walk in the park.

We’ve tackled these problems by forming an editorial team, which has two responsibilities: review all posts prior to publication for legal issues, and constantly contribute posts. editorial team volunteers are interested in creative writing, so it is fun for them, and good for the blog.

I am the Chief Editor of IMTC blog, so if any of the readers are interested in being guest bloggers, feel free to contact me.

I also want to thank Boaz Babai for supporting us in this process.


Bookmark Me

AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Add to Technorati Favorites

Top Posts

Kfir Pravda's Facebook profile

Archives

Some del.icio.us love!