Posts Tagged 'Tim O’Reilly'

Come On – Grow Up! (Social Media Walls II)

A guy leaves his cellphone on a table. A girl picks it up, and goes through his contact list. Simple story isn’t it? The girl is rude, the guy needs to get his act together, end of story.

Well, not if you are a blogger. When Kevin Burton left his phone on the table, Megan McCarthy picked it up and went through his contact list. Now, that was stupid. But why did it have to go through blogs in the community? What’s so interesting in an event that happens all the time to regular people out there? It even got to Tech.Meme! Megan works for Valleywag. So? It shows that Megan should have thought about what she is doing, and should be sent to bed without dinner. Big deal.

Whenever I talk with non-2.0 people why don’t they read blogs, they say, among other reasons– that blogs are full with personal and irrelevant information. I’m not talking about personal I-like-my-puppy blogs. I’m talking about professional blogs, on serious topics. I personally believe that some information should be filtered out. Like these incidents, that don’t add anything to the readers. Having said that – take a look at Violet Blue‘s comment here– can’t agree more.

Blog is a conversation. It doesn’t mean you have to tell everything to everyone.

Delivering Web Video to TV – How Will It Affect Content Creators?

In the recent months we see new ways to deliver web videos to your television. Apple TV, and Tivo’s new features are just two examples of this trend. With new Media Centers out there, we can assume that this trend will increase in both magnitude and importance.

How will it affect the world of independent content creators? I believe that this process is a double edge sword:

1 . We will see more exposure to independent content creators – as shows like Ask a Ninja and Something To Be Desired will be shown on living room TV sets, one of the major barriers of entry to these new media creators will be removed – people won’t need to watch video online, but in their regular TV. Though seems logical, I believe that this process will take some time to happen. Though Tivo users are not necessarily early adopters I still believe that it will take some time till my mother will use media center. Therefore, it is not clear how many new users will start watching web shows, as I assume that media savvy early adopters already watch them.

2. Production quality will rise – though current production quality of indie content creators is very good, when moving from small video screen in a web site to full blown TV format, things change. In the 3D animation company I had in the past, we had a clear distinction between productions for internet, mobile, television, and cinema as the effort to create high quality show is correlated with screen size in some aspects. Small details are more apparent.

3. And it will be harder to beat the competition – today most people do not expect the same level of product from internet video as they expect from television show. When users will be able to see a web show, and a minute later another episode of Studio 60 or Prison Break, their level of expectation will change, starting with script level, through actors, and general production value. This is THE major challenge for indie content creators in my opinion – as they begin to be an alternative to regular television.

4. Indie content creators will change the type of content they are creating – from short, 5-8 minutes flicks, to longer formats. The attention span in television is longer than in the internet, and people are willing to watch longer formats there. However, it might prove to be the killer of this industry. Longer formats are usually more expensive, and complicated to produce. As production cost and complexity rise, the competitive advantage of indie content creators, the ability to create quality content cheaply, is lost. Time will tell if there are enough talented creators to face the high profile, high cost productions out there. It might be that this will be the first wave of Creative Darwinism, when only the most talented content creators will survive.

How do you see it?

More to come…

UPDATE:Tim O’Reilly’s Code of Conduct – Nice Try, Wrong Direction

Tim O’Reilly presented a nice concept – blogging code of conduct . This voluntary code suppose to make blogs more civilized environment, help us all to keep our dignity while blogging, and end world hunger problems. It was also picked up by NY Times.

I feel strongly about making blogs a more accessible medium for people outside the social media walls. I promote it both online and offline. But what O’reilley wrote really doesn’t help. It misses the point in my opinion.

You see, Tim is trying to make us all very nice and coasy with each other, open to others, and generally nice people. I don’t have a problem with that. But I opened a blog to write whatever I want. That’s the whole point of having a blog – publish my thoughts and ideas, without any censorship. If I have something smart to say -readers will come. if not – they won’t. Simple. Easy.

Kathy Sierra’s story is sad, and makes me angry every time I read it. But it is not different from other cases, where media celebrities were threatened and even murdered due to racist, sexual or pure hate reasons. Hey, Howard Stern made his career from saying unconventional things on air!

The same goes for publishing what Tim define as inappropriate content:

“…We define unacceptable content as anything included or linked to that:

– is being used to abuse, harass, stalk, or threaten others
– is libelous, knowingly false, ad-hominem, or misrepresents another person,
– infringes upon a copyright or trademark
– violates an obligation of confidentiality
– violates the privacy of others …”

All these points are important but are handled by the legal system of each country. If you are offended by a post, you can always react, either online or offline. Why is there a need for such a code?

Let’s try to solve the real problems bloggers have – gaining respectability from the regular newspapers readers, explaining the medium to people not involved in it, and gt more readers involved in this new type of media. We can be nicer to each other later….

Update (11th of April): Jeff Jarvis wrote a great post about the subject here. You can also find Andy’s opinion (from VoIP Watch) on the topic. Didn’t see too many positive reactions till now…


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