Posts Tagged 'Jeff Jarvis'

Economics of New Media Market – Link-O-Rama

NewTeeVee » Video Funding Keeps on Coming – post about financial rounds in the online video industry

paidContent.org: The Economics of Content – @ Streaming Media: Video Blogs Try To Hold On To New Media Values As Old Media Pays Attention – forwarded by a friend, this excellent post provides additional figures (wallstrip chapter costs 2500$, Scobleshow makes 6 figures for Podtech a quarter).

The Business Of Online Video: Mogulus, Vator.tv, ScanScout and Black 20 All Get Funding – another post about video related financial rounds.

VentureBeat » Kyte.tv raises single-digit millions for online TV channel service, from prominent European investors.

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UPDATE:Tim O’Reilly’s Code of Conduct – Nice Try, Wrong Direction

Tim O’Reilly presented a nice concept – blogging code of conduct . This voluntary code suppose to make blogs more civilized environment, help us all to keep our dignity while blogging, and end world hunger problems. It was also picked up by NY Times.

I feel strongly about making blogs a more accessible medium for people outside the social media walls. I promote it both online and offline. But what O’reilley wrote really doesn’t help. It misses the point in my opinion.

You see, Tim is trying to make us all very nice and coasy with each other, open to others, and generally nice people. I don’t have a problem with that. But I opened a blog to write whatever I want. That’s the whole point of having a blog – publish my thoughts and ideas, without any censorship. If I have something smart to say -readers will come. if not – they won’t. Simple. Easy.

Kathy Sierra’s story is sad, and makes me angry every time I read it. But it is not different from other cases, where media celebrities were threatened and even murdered due to racist, sexual or pure hate reasons. Hey, Howard Stern made his career from saying unconventional things on air!

The same goes for publishing what Tim define as inappropriate content:

“…We define unacceptable content as anything included or linked to that:

– is being used to abuse, harass, stalk, or threaten others
– is libelous, knowingly false, ad-hominem, or misrepresents another person,
– infringes upon a copyright or trademark
– violates an obligation of confidentiality
– violates the privacy of others …”

All these points are important but are handled by the legal system of each country. If you are offended by a post, you can always react, either online or offline. Why is there a need for such a code?

Let’s try to solve the real problems bloggers have – gaining respectability from the regular newspapers readers, explaining the medium to people not involved in it, and gt more readers involved in this new type of media. We can be nicer to each other later….

Update (11th of April): Jeff Jarvis wrote a great post about the subject here. You can also find Andy’s opinion (from VoIP Watch) on the topic. Didn’t see too many positive reactions till now…

VON07: Jeff Jarvis Industry Perspective – We are taking over TV!

Let’s try some live blogging. I am at Jeff Jarvis industry perspective.

Here are the highlights:

  1. We are networks – we have channels, we have shows, we have series. we don’t have money but not expenses. We are TV – and we just began. We are 1954 in TV – TV sucked then, we suck now, but we will get better cause we can’t get worse.
  2. The advertisers give up – they loose and so are we. Our real friends have hard time in finding us. There is no longer one definition of good. The definition of big changes – blockbuster is dead. The top 100 shows are still very small.
  3. It’s about conversation – the most watched list is meaningless, size doesn’t matter – but quality does.
  4. We can do things right, and define what is right.
  5. What should we do? Our roughness is good. We don’t want to be old TV- let’s hope we don’t become one. we shouldn’t have orthodoxy.
  6. We will distribute our content in various outlets. The viewers are not going to come to us. We have to go to them.
  7. Viacom legal action is stupid. YouTube gives recommendation on Viacom shows – why kill it?
  8. Old media is about control. We need to understand how we can work without control and still get money.
  9. We can work with the big guys, by cooperation. Viral is great but hard, but the good stuff are the series, that build audience over time.
  10. Money – I am not getting any money. We are not ready for advertisers.

What do we need?

  1. Measurements – Metrics is sex. In a distributed world it is harder than usual. we need context – we need a unique identifier to every video item we distribute.
  2. We need to experiment on ads
  3. We need to serve ads across platforms
  4. Trust and identity of our content across networks
  5. Help the advertisers and viewers to get in touch with us
  6. How to find good content?
  7. Relationships – big old TV won’t die and is not the enemy. they give infrastructure, we can teach them how to be smarter. CBS is doing great as they use Youtube, unlike Viacom
  8. Protection against regulation – this is not content, this is conversation. we need to fight to keep TV ours.
  9. Creativity – we will make better stuff…

This guy is very energetic, and knows how wake up the crowd. Read more at his blog.

VON07 New Video Summit – Advertisers Are In the Dark Ages, No One Knows How to Make Money from Online Video, and We Have a Window of Opportunity of 3 Years

Yesterday was the first day of VON, here in San Jose. I spent most of my time at the New Video Summit, discussing the new media world. Most panels were insightful and engaging. Panels were led by Om Malik and Rafat Ali, among others.

If we want to summarize the event in one clear statement here it is:

No one has a clue what will happen in this field.

Here are some of the highlights:

1. Content discovery is the number one problem for video creators and aggregators. Channels is one way to tackle it, and everybody are looking for technology to create them easily.

2. Advertisers are not embracing the new medium yet, though sponsorships are starting to flow, especially on blip.tv (or at least their impressive COO, Dina Kaplan, was the most vocal about it). Targeted ads is what everyone is looking for, but no one knows how to do it.

3. Most panelists stated that You Tube – Viacom dispute would not change the industry, but eventually create new rules of engagement between traditional and new media companies. The general consensus was that “the future is here” and these disputes would not destroy this young industry.

4. Not surprisingly, all site owners support net neutrality. At the same time most panelists agree that Quality of Service is important for industry growth. I wonder how these two views co-exist.

5. In Rafat Ali‘s panel, two interesting assumptions were made: one is that it will take 3 years to this industry to pick up and bring economic value to its players, and it will mature in 5 years. So, my dear readers , we have a lot of work to do….

6. In the same panel, most panelists stated that Google would find a way to monetize this new medium for local advertisers, and by doing so mature the market. When I sat behind Jeff Jarvis, it seemed like he agreed with them…

More to come….


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